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Calcasieu Historical Preservation Society

Lost Landmarks by Year

Trolley Tour Photos

 CHPS Trolley Tour-10
CHPS Trolley Tour-28
 CHPS Trolley Tour-30
 CHPS Trolley Tour-12
 CHPS Trolley Tour-25
CHPS Trolley Tour-27
CHPS Trolley Tour-18
 CHPS Trolley Tour-15

District Maps & Guidelines

Lost Railroad Stations

The Lost Landmark sign for the Missouri-Pacific Depot and other lost Train stations is on the grounds of the Safety Council Building at Clarence and Ryan.

Missouri Pacific "Iron Mountain" DepotThe marker for Lost Railroad stations ncludes the locations of the Southern Pacific, Union, and KCS depots. 

The "I.M. Depot" printing on the image to left the refers to the Iron Mountain Depot which was the popular name for the Missouri Pacific Railroad Depot.

 

The water seen in the photo is overflow from the Pithon Colulee during the 1913 flood.  The photo was taken from the NW looking SE.

The railroad tracks actually ended at the coulee at Ryan Street. The tracks continue south on Common, then East along 12th street to the North.  This track went to Alexandria and points North.

TheDepotThe photo to the left is of the Southern Pacific Depot* for passengers and was completed in 1899. It replaced the freight and passenger depot built in 1880.

This depot was the one lost to fire in 1984 and its matching freight terminal was demolished shortly thereafter due to the relocation of freight operations.

The steel brackets from the passenger depot were used on the Amtrak station at Ryan and Railroad Avenue. 

Southern Pacific Railroad MSU ArchivesThe caption by Maude Reid for the photo to the left: "The old Southern Pacific Passenger and Freight Depot on Battle Row (Railroad Avenue), between Kirkman and Reid streets. 

Built in 1880. Torn down in 1899. Notice the Wells Fargo Express wagon, and the slaughtered pigs awaiting delivery. Part of Rigmaiden's Bakery and Saloon can be seen at the right."

 

Kansas City Southern 1925The Kansas City Southern Terminal in Lake Charles was located at the corner of Lawrence (now Pryce) and Ryan Street.

Constructed in 1925, t replaced the earlier Union Station located to the West at Front and Pryce Street. Even today, the remains of impressive roundhouse of railroad tracks can be seen at that corner.

Kansas City Southern promoted a mission style architecture for its depots and terminals. 

The DeQuincy KCS station is a good example of what was lost in Lake Charles. 

This link leads to information about the DeQuincy Railroad Museum.

Additional photos of these Lost Landmarks as well as newspaper and magazine clippings are available below, courtesy of the McNeese Archives.

These Lost Landmarks were recognized during the special Trolley Tour held on Saturday, September 26th, 2015 


Episcopal Church Students Board Train

The Role of Railroad Stations in Southwest Louisiana

The newspaper caption for this 1950 photo (right) read, "Members of the Episcopal church of the Good Shepherd are pictured at the Missouri Pacific Railroad terminal Monday as they boarded a train for Alexandria, where they were met by a bus that took them to the church camp for a two-weeks' period.

From left to right they are: Jeanette Francis, Brenda Bell, Georgia Baumgardner, Jonell Vestal, Alice Nagem, Cynthia Townbridge, of Orange, Texas; Ernestine Mandel, and on the train steps Mary Linda Francis and Edith Linbocker."

This photo was provided by the McNeese Archives from the Maude Reid Scrapbook collection.


 

Happy Group Entrains for US Forest Camps

Newspaper photograph (left) of young men hanging out of a train car's windows in 1933.

Other people mill about outside the train. Caption: "Part of the group of 400 jubilant Roosevelt reforestation camp workers from the Lake Charles district just before their train pulled out for Fort Benning, Ga., where they will be given conditioning training two weeks before being sent to the work areas.

The men, ranging in age from 18 to 25, got a taste of army life in physical examinations when they were put through rigid tests a few hours before entraining. Captain C. W. Chalker of New Orleans was recruiting officer stationed here for the Lake Charles district."

This image is from the Maude Reid Scrapbooks courtesy of McNeese Archives. Click on this link for complete information on this image. While on the McNeese Archives, take a tour of this incredible site and service that has provided permission for use of the photos on CalcasieuPreservation.org.


 

Southern Pacific train station in WWII wounded soldiersLeft: Men lying on stretchers at the Southern Pacific train station.

The printed caption reads "On stretchers at Lake Charles station, casualties from 43rd Evacuation Hospital wait for train to take them to New Orleans Field Hospital."

The photo is from the Maude Reid scrapbooks, courtesy of the McNeese Archives. It appeared in Life Magazine in October of 1941.

*Due to rail line mergers and acquisitions, the names of Railroad Depots changed periodcally. In marking, the most commonly accepted local names were used. 

Image Sources

CHPS gratefully acknowledges the McNeese Archives and the Louisiana Digital Library as the source for many of the photos in this section of the website as well as other photos throughout CalcasieuPreservation.org.

Over 5,000 images can be found within the digital library, especially in the "Historic Photographs of Southwest Louisiana" section. Many come from the Maude Reid scrapbooks that document much of life in Southwest Louisiana during the early 1900s. 

The Calcasieu Parish Public Library retains ownership of the Maude Reid Scrapbooks. The Scrapbooks are under indefinite loan to the McNeese State University Department of Archives & Special Collections.

Long time CHPS member Virginia Webb served as photographer for the Trolley Tour.